Rkatsiteli

Rkatsiteli means “red stem”, and is the sturdy workhorse of white grapes in Georgia. It is cultivated throughout its native Kakheti, and in Kartli. Rkatsiteli is disease resistant, and ripens reliably. It is responsible for high-volume, good value whites, but also for high quality examples, especially in skin-fermented Qvevri wines. In key sites Rkatsiteli produces…

Mtsvane Kakhuri

This name means “green Kakheti,” and is usually called simply “Mtsvane” (Green). Mtsvane Kakhuri is one of six different Mtsvane that grow throughout Georgia, each with a different DNA fingerprint, and each named for the origin of its growth. Older than Rkatsiteli, Mtsvane Kakhuri’s five-lobed leaves are dark green and funneled; the medium-sized bunches can…

Goruli Mtsvane

Not to be confused with the Mtsvane Kakheti, this “Green Gori” has a variety of alternative names and synonyms. Commercially, however, it is labelled consistently as Goruli Mtsvane. The variety is mostly planted in the alluvial soils along the Mtkvari River including the Ateni Valley. Goruli Mtsvane exhibits considerable intra-variety variability; some can be low-yielding…

Chinuri

Iv. Javakhishvili, an early 20th Century historian, argued that Chinuri’s name derives the old Georgian word “chini” (reddish-green), but commentators now contend it comes the Georgian word “chinebuli” meaning “excellent” or “the best” in this instance referring to the grapes superb appearance, colour, and flavour. Indeed, some producers even call the variety “Chinebuli.” Regardless, when…

Khikhvi

The origins of Khikhvi’s name are unknown, but it grows widely in eastern Georgia, especially in Kakheti it originated. Most plantings are on the East-Southeast reaches of the province, on the right bank of the Alazani River, and there are some plantings in Kartli. The vine sports large leaves, which are three-lobed, circular and almost…

Kisi

Kisi is indigenous to Kakheti. Notwithstanding the high quality of wine it can produce, it became almost extinct by the 2000, a result of the Soviet preference for Rkatsiteli and the decline of Georgian vineyard land following the Soviet collapse. Further, it is bit trickier to grow. Fortunately, some 50-60 year old vines still exist…

Krakhuna

Krakhuna is indigenous to Imereti in western Georgia – the name means “crispy” in Imeretian dialect. It is grown in the central part of the province, around Sviri, Obcha and Dimi. Its bunches are of medium size, dense and conical, with thin-skinned berries. Depending on the meteorological conditions of its site, Krakhuna tends to bud…

Tsitska

Grown throughout upper and central Imereti, Tsitska means “variety with small grapes from the village of Tsitske or Tstiskiuri.” (Iv. Javakhishvili ). By current standards, however, the grape is of medium size, with thick skins. The medium-sized, generally conical bunches tend to be compact and dense. Budburst is generally mid-April, with ripening at the beginning…